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Muay Thai Rules

 

General Guidelines

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This document is being prepared in an effort to offer unified rules and general guidelines to consider when reviewing a proposed muay thai event. Unlike boxing and mixed martial arts, muay thai does not currently have a unified rule set.

There will always some contention between the “pure” rules as utilized in Thailand and what would commonly be accepted in North America.

I am a firm believer in unified rules across jurisdictions which I believe helps to further the growth of a sport.

Pre-Fight Rituals 17

The referee should order the fight to start only after the contestants have completed their pre-fight rituals, in accordance with Thai traditions. The Referee should instruct the seconds/corner men to remove any ceremonial garb when their fighter returns to his corner after he/she has performed the pre-fight ritual.

However, Commissions may wish to notify the contestants of a time limit on their pre-fight rituals. (for example, three minutes maximum)

Amulets are sacred and highly respected items believed to bestow blessings and protection. All Muay Thai fighters must use the mongkon, a head circlet, which is worn until completion of the Ram Muay ritual dance, and the prajed, a woven armband. The prajed contains a small Buddha image and is worn throughout the match. Such must be neatly wrapped and covered with cloth.

The special relationship between a Muay Thai fighter and his trainer are gracefully expressed during the Ram Muay that

precedes every Muay Thai match. This ancient tradition is a further demonstration of the fighter’s respect and gratitude. The Ram Muay is a series of gestures and movements performed in rhythm to ringside musical accompaniment. The Ram Muay developed differently in various regions under different teachers. Two fighters performing identical Ram Muay rituals would know they studied under the same teacher or came from the same school, and likely would not compete against each other. Today, it is not so easy to tell the difference in rituals. Wearing the traditional mongkon head circlets created from monk’s writings that are wrapped in silk thread, the fighter moves gracefully in the center of the ring, bowing in all directions. The ritual is a gesture of respect for the fighter’s trainer and family.

The sarama or musical accompaniment to Muay Thai accompanies the Ram Muay as well as the contest itself. The music is performed by musicians playing oboes, Thai drums and cymbals. The tempo of the music varies. During the Ram Muay it is slow and to respect the mood of the ritual. When the fight commences the tempo is increased.

Use of Ointments, Etc. (Namman Muay)

As in boxing and mixed martial arts, the application of limited Vaseline to the face at ringside is permissible. Unlike boxing and mixed martial arts, the use of Thai liniment (Namman Muay) is permissible and typically expected, to be applied to the fighter’s body.

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Namman Muay, however, is a specific item and should not be confused with other oils, greases, ointments, balms or butters such as Tiger Balm, IcyHot or Cocoa Butter.

Groin Protection

Unlike boxing or mixed martial arts, Commissions should mandate and require that muay thai contestants, at any level, wear a steel cup.

Suggested Weight Classes 19

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From 100 pounds but not over 105 pounds Must be over 105 pounds but not over 108 pounds Must be over 108 pounds but not over 112 pounds Must be over 112 pounds but not over 115 pounds Must be over 115 pounds but not over 118 pounds

Mini Flyweight Light Flyweight Flyweight Super Flyweight Bantamweight Super Bantamweight Must be over 118 pounds but not over 122 pounds Featherweight Must be over 122 pounds but not over 126 pounds Super Featherweight Must be over 126 pounds but not over 130 pounds

Lightweight Super Lightweight Welterweight Super Welterweight Middleweight Super Middleweight Light Heavyweight Cruiserweight

Must be over 130 pounds but not over 135 pounds Must be over 135 pounds but not over 140 pounds Must be over 140 pounds but not over 147 pounds

Must be over 147 pounds but not over than 154 pounds Must be over 154 pounds but not over than 160 pounds Must be over 160 pounds but not over than 168 pounds

Must be over 168 pounds but not over 175 pounds Must be over 175 pounds but not over than 190 pounds

Super Cruiserweight Heavyweight Super Heavyweight

Must be over 190 pounds but not over 210 pounds Must be over

210 pounds but not over 230 pounds 230 pounds and up

It is recommended that the unwritten custom of the one pound allowance for non-title bouts be continued, but only if provided for in the written bout contract or by regulation.

Commissions may also approve catch weight bouts, subject to their review and discretion. For example, the Commission may still decide to allow the contest if it feels that the contest would still be fair, safe and competitive if a set catch weight is set in advance.

In addition, if one athlete weighs in at 227 pounds while the opponent weighs in at 232, the Commission may still decide to allow the contest if it feels that the contest would still be fair and competitive. This would be despite the fact that the two athletes weighed in at differing weight classes.

No Fighter shall be permitted to lose more than 2% of his/her bout weight after initially failing to make weight. The weight loss described in subsection 3 must not occur later than 1 hour after the initial weigh-in.

Commissions should establish and make known to promoters the maximum allowable weight differences for contestants for each weight class. For example,

. No unarmed combatants may engage in a contest or exhibition, without the approval of the Commission or the Commission’s representative if the difference in weight between unarmed combatants exceeds the allowance shown in the following schedule:

up to 118 lbs……………………………… not more than 3 lbs. 118 lbs.-

126 lbs…………………………. not more than 5 lbs. 126 lbs.-160

lbs………………………… not more than 7 lbs. 160 lbs.-

175……………………………… not more than 9 lbs. 175 lbs.-195

lbs………………………… not more than 12 lbs. 195lbs.and over

………………………………. no limit. 20

Training for Referees and Judges

The Committee suggests that parties who hold training courses to educate current or prospective muay thai and/or referees, submit their full course training materials to this specific ABC Committee for our review and comment.

Upon approval of a submitted course curriculum, this Committee will notify the ABC President as to which courses have been reviewed and approved.

The ABC President can then list on its website or issue a press release noting that a course has been reviewed and endorsed by the ABC.

The Committee strongly suggests that each Commission utilize properly trained muay thai judges and referees and continually evaluate their performances and competency. In addition, post- event performance reviews should be conducted, and training and review courses should be regularly held for all officials, including inspectors.

Handwraps

All contestants shall be required to gauze and tape their hands prior to all contests.

In all weight classes, the bandages on each contestant’s hand shall be restricted to soft gauze cloth not more than 20 yards in length not more than two inches in width, held in place by not more than 10 feet of surgeon’s tape, not more than two inches in width, for each hand.

The tape may cross the back of the hand twice, but may not extend within three-fourths of an inch of the knuckles when the hand is clenched to make a fist.

Strips of tape may be used between the fingers to hold down the bandages.

The bandages shall be evenly distributed across the hand. It is absolutely prohibited to “top – up” on the knuckles.

Bandages and tape shall be placed on the contestant’s hands in the dressing room in the presence of the inspector and, if warranted, in the presence of the manager or chief second of his or her opponent.

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Substances other than surgeon’s tape and gauze shall not be utilized. For example, pre wraps should not be used.

Females

Females competitors should be allowed to compete in the same round time lengths and number of rounds as men.

Gloves

Gloves should be supplied by the promoter and approved by the commission. No contestant shall supply their own gloves for participation.

Gloves must weigh a minimum of eight ounces or above. Weight Class of 160 lbs. and above must wear 10 ounce Gloves. With Commission approval, six ounce gloves may be permitted for for weight classes up to, and including featherweight.

Gloves must not be squeezed, kneaded or crushed to change the original shape.

The gloves used in the competitions must have the leather portion not heavier than one-half of the glove’s total weight and the glove’s inner pads must weigh at least one-half of the glove’s total weight.

Gloves must only be placed on the Fighter in the presence of an Inspector.

New replacement Gloves must be kept at ringside.

All gloves must have the distal portion of the thumb attached to the body of the glove so as to minimize the possibility of injury to an opponent’s eye.

Gloves should be wiped by referee after knockdown, slip or fall of contestant before the fallen contestant may resume competing, the referee shall wipe the gloves with a damp towel or the referee’s shirt.

Downward Pointed Elbow Strikes- Ceiling to floor or 12 to 6 elbow strikes should be prohibited.

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Double Knockout Situations-

The referee shall stop a contest or exhibition of unarmed combat at any stage if the referee determines that both unarmed combatants are in such a condition that to continue might subject the unarmed combatants to serious injury. If a contest or exhibition is stopped pursuant to this subsection, the decision shall be deemed to be a technical draw.

Scoring-

Muay Thai suggests that techniques should be strong and delivered

with power to score. Judges should not only make an assessment of the actions of the contestant delivering the blow. They must also assess the effect of the technique on the opponent. These assessments include stopping an opponent’s advance, unbalancing the opponent, slowing the opponent’s own offense, and causing the opponent to show pain.

The winner in Muay Thai is the stronger fighter over the entire contest length. This means that the fighter needs to maintain physical and mental equilibrium as well as demonstrating their superiority in technique. Landing a strike, in and of itself, does not always mean that it is a scoring strike.

The 10 point must system, as utilized in boxing, is the preferred scoring method at this time.

The 10 point must system is defined as follows:

All bouts will be evaluated and scored by three judges.

The 10-Point Must System will be the standard system of scoring a bout. Under the 10-Point Must Scoring System, 10 points must be awarded to the winner of the round and nine points or less must be awarded to the loser, except for an even round, which is scored

(10-10).

Effective striking is judged by determining the number of legal strikes landed by a contestant and the significance of such legal strikes.

Fighting area control is judged by determining who is dictating the pace, location and position of the bout

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Effective aggressiveness means moving forward and landing a legal strike.

Effective defense means avoiding being struck while countering with offensive attacks.

The following objective scoring criteria shall be utilized by the judges when scoring a round;

  1. A round is to be scored as a 10-10 Round when both contestants appear to be fighting evenly and neither contestant shows dominance in a round;

  2. A round is to be scored as a 10-9 Round when a contestant wins by a close but clear margin, landing the greater number of effective legal strikes and other maneuvers;

  3. A round is to be scored as a 10-8 Round when a contestant wins a round by a wide margin and damages his opponent.

  4. A round is to be scored as a 10-7 Round when a contestant totally and completely dominates in a round and damages his opponent.

    TECHNIQUES which have a visible impact on the Opponent should be weighed most heavily.

    1. Consider the Effectiveness of the Strike, its Strength, and Target and how much it causes Disadvantage to the Opponent.

    2. Knocking the Opponent to the ground with a legal Strike. c. Unbalancing the Opponent with a legal Strike. d. Techniques that cause the Opponent to stop advancing. e. Techniques that force an Opponent to cover up and limit his/her offense. f. Defense and ability to evade the Opponent’s attack.

  1. Maintenance of proper Footwork, Balance, Stance and Stamina. ROUND ONE: Generally Scored as 10/10 but a note is made as to

    the better Fighter, unless clear Dominance or Knock Downs are

    present.

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    ROUND TWO: Can also be scored as 10/10 if is close or the losing Fighter in Round One wins by a small margin.

    Rounds one and two are commonly scored as 10-10 rounds because it is usually difficult to declare a winner when both fighters are fresh, strong and utilizing proper technique. The reason for the later rounds being scored decisively is because the judge can now see the accumulative effect of the earlier blows and more clearly determine which fighter is fresher, stronger, and still maintaining proper technique.

    ROUNDS THREE, FOUR AND FIVE: Are to be Decisively Scored for one Fighter.

    In the sport of muay thai, a much greater emphasis is placed on how a fighter finishes the fight. Analogies are often made to a marathon race. Although one fighter may begin strongly and dominate early in the fight, it is the finish that is important and a boxer behind early can be overtaken and lose. Greater emphasis is given to a fighter finishing strongest over the last three rounds.

    For amateur bouts, it may be preferable to promote 5 rounds of 1.5 minute rounds, rather than 3 rounds of 2 minutes. If using 3 round bouts, it is advisable to notify all involved parties that the first round will be scored on its own merits and should not be assumed to be a 10-10.

    Scoring Techniques:

    The technique, preferably should be a muay thai technique and not a kick or strike from another form of martial art. The technique should have a visible effect on an opponent. If a technique strikes the opponent’s arms or shin, then generally the technique doesn’t score. However, there are exceptions. For example, if a kick makes contact with a fighter’s arm and physically moves the person being

    kicked or causes them to lose balance, solely due to the kick’s power, that kick would score; although not as highly as a kick that had the same effect but cleanly made contact with the body.

    The most scored techniques are those that have the greatest effect on the opponent. It is not the number or variety of techniques delivered but their effectiveness that is important in determining the winner of a fight. For example, it is possible for one competitor to use one type of technique exclusively and win if the use of that technique results in that competitor delivering more, effective techniques than their opponent (one competitor may win by only kneeing their opponent.)

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    The judges must ignore the sounds at ringside and focus on looking carefully at each technique. Corner persons and the crowd at muay thai events are very vocal and typically yell each and every single time that their chosen contestant seems to land a strike. Judges should only score techniques which they actually see land.

    Scoring of incomplete rounds-

    There should be scoring of an incomplete round. If the referee penalizes either contestant, then the appropriate points shall be deducted when the scorekeeper calculates the final score for the partial round.

    Bout Results

    1. KNOCKOUT: a. When an Opponent is unable to regain his/her feet prior to the Count of Ten.

      b. When any Fighter falls out of the Ring, the Referee shall Count immediately.

      1. If the Count reaches 20, the fallen Fighter cannot come up on the Ring and he/she will lose by K.O.

      2. If the fallen Fighter can come up on the Ring before Counting up to 20, he/she can continue the Fight.

    2. TECHNICAL KNOCKOUT: a. When the Referee orders the Fight stopped because it is determined that one Fighter is not fit to continue.

      b. When a Fighter cannot answer the Bell for the upcoming Round or is so badly cut that it is too dangerous to continue.

    3. SUBMISSION: a. When one Fighter notifies the Referee that he/she no longer wishes to continue.

      b. When a licensed Second assigned to a Fighter throws in the towel.

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    4. UNANIMOUS DECISION: All three Judges score in favor of one Fighter.

    5. MAJORITY DECISION: Two Judges score in favor of one Fighter and one Judge has is a draw.

    6. SPLIT DECISION: Two Judges score in favor of one Fighter, while one Judge scores in favor of the other.

    7. DISQUALIFICATION: Due to an intentional fouls or fouls, a Referee may Disqualify a Fighter.

    8. TECHNICAL DRAW: In case of an intentional violation which causes injury AND the Fight is continued BUT is later stopped because of the initial foul, the Referee should stop the Fight and give a TKO Draw a. If the scores are equal OR

      b. If the fouled Fighter is behind on the cards.

    9. TECHNICAL DECISION: a. In case of an intentional violation which causes injury AND the Fight is continued BUT is later stopped because of the initial foul, the Referee should declare a Victory for the fouled Fighter if he/she is ahead on the cards.

      b. If a Fight cannot continue due to an unintentional foul but enough Rounds have been completed, the Referee shall declare a Victory for the Fighter ahead on the score cards.

    10. NO CONTEST: In case of an unintentional violation which causes injury so serious that the Fight cannot be continued BUT less than enough Rounds have been completed.

    11. DRAW: When the score cards result in a three way tie.

    12. MAJORITY DRAW: When two Judges score the Fight a Draw AND one Judge has declared a Victor.

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Fouls- The following are fouls and will result in penalties if committed: 1. Head Butting

  1. Strikes to the Groin- hits to the groin area/lower abdomen just below the navel called ‘neb” is permitted and is classic technique. This is the reason why Thai boxers where a steel cup to protect the testicles as opposed to a western style boxer full groin protector. Thus, strikes to the testicles (cup area) are what are to be considered as fouls.

  2. Direct Attacks to the Knee- it is considered unsporting in Thai to side kick an opponent to the front of the knee

  3. Strikes to the Back of the Head

  4. Strikes to the Spine

  5. Strikes to the Throat

  6. Striking a Fighter while he/she is Down

  7. Striking a Fighter while he/she is under the Referee’s care

  8. Shoving, Throwing or Wrestling an Opponent except when Pushing in a legal Clinch

  9. Striking when the Referee has called a Break 11. Striking after the Bell has sounded

  1. Holding the Ropes or using the ropes as a weapon, for example pushing an opponent’s face across the ropes in an attempt to cut them.

  2. Timidity or intentionally avoiding contact 14. The use of abusive language or abusive gestures

  1. Causing intentional Delays in the action, such as repeatedly spitting out the Mouth Piece

  2. Eye Gouging 17. Hair Pulling

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18. Biting or Spitting 19. Holding the Opponent’s shorts 20. Interference from a Fighter’s Seconds

  1. Tripping or Sweeping an Opponent- Using trips and sweeps; it is legal to kick an opponent off their feet. A kick is considered to be an action that uses the top of the foot and/or front of the shin. It is possible to hook the foot and kick as long as the top of the foot and/or shin, and not the side of the foot, make contact with the opponent’s leg.

  2. Hip Throws, Shoulder or Leg Throws

  3. Grasping the Opponent’s Lower Back while also forcing an opponent’s spine to hyperextend.

  4. Intentionally falling on a down Opponent, pressing Elbow or Knee upon him/her

  5. Wrestling, back or arm locks or any similar judo or wrestling hold 26. Attempting to ‘pile-drive’ an opponent’s head into the canvas

  1. Catching an opponent’s kick and pushing an opponent for MORE than three steps without attempting to deliver an attacking technique. (i.e. permissible to catch your opponent’s kick, hold your opponent’s leg, and take up to three steps)

  2. After kicking with his kicking leg being caught, the boxer pretends to throw himself down on ring floor. It is considered taking advantage over his opponent.

Fouls are subject to the Discretion of the Referee. Fouls may result in a Warning, a Point Deduction of one to two Points or Disqualification. The Referee will base his Decision on the Severity of the Foul and the Intent of the Fouling Fighter.

The referee may consider :

  1. A Fighter who Violates the Rules intentionally but does not put the Opponent at a Disadvantage or Injure him/her shall be given one Warning or be assessed a one Point Deduction.

  2. A Fighter who Violates the Rules intentionally and puts the Opponent at a Disadvantage or makes him/her unable to continue the Fight shall be Disqualified and lose the Fight.

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  3. In case of an unintentional Violation, the Referee shall give no more than two Warnings before assessing a Point Deduction.

Fouls Further Explained:

  1. DIRECT (SIDE KICK STYLE) KICKS to the Front of a

    Fighter’s Legs are illegal.

  2. HIP THROWS: a. Over the Hip Throws such as in Japanese arts like Judo, Jujitsu, Karate, Sambo, or San Shou are illegal.

    1. A Fighter is not allowed to use the Hip or Shoulder to Throw an Opponent in any kind of Judo Throw or Reap.

    2. A Fighter is not allowed to Step across or in front of an Opponent’s Leg with his/her own Leg and bring the Opponent over his/her Hip.

    3. Taking an Opponent around the Waist with both Arms and Twisting him/her off balance so the Opponent will fall is legal.

  3. A Fighter is not allowed to Twist and Pull an Opponent over the side of his/her body and then land on top.

  4. It is an Intentional Foul when a Fighter plans, with the sole intention of falling on top of his/her Opponent, to either strike with the knee or to intentionally hurt the Opponent while down, by contriving to make it look like an accident.

  5. Stepping on a fallen Opponent is illegal.

  6. ILLEGAL TRIPS: a. If a Fighter positions a Foot next to the Opponent and Twists him/her over the Leg, it is an illegal Trip unless the Leg is cleared as the Opponent falls.

    1. If a Fighter Spins or Pulls the Opponent over the inside or outside of the Leg and Dumps him/her on the ground, it is an illegal Trip when the Leg being used to Manipulate and Dump the Opponent stays in that position as he/she goes down.

    2. If the Leg is Set and stays in that position, it is an illegal Throw

      or Trip. 30

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    3. The Leg must Clear immediately after the Opponent is Pulled or Tripped over the Knee. Clear means that the Leg must be moved out of the way before the Opponent hits the canvas by skipping the leg or slightly jumping to the side, as long as it is moved from the original position. Taking out an Opponent’s Footing is legal only if the Tripping Leg is withdrawn from contact as he/she falls to the ground.

  7. NECK WRESTLING: a. If in a Clinch with Arms around each other’s Shoulder, such as to deliver or defend from an Elbow Strike, twisting the Opponent using the Upper Body in such a way that he/she will fall to the ground is allowed.

    b. By using Neck and Shoulder manipulation, it is legal for a Fighter to Spin and Throw/Dump an Opponent to the canvas without using any part of his/her body as a barrier.

  8. SWEEPING: a. A Fighter is allowed to Roundhouse Kick the Opponent’s supporting Leg with the Top of his/her own Foot or Shin, taking out the Opponent’s footing, but Karate style Sweeps with the Foot’s Instep is illegal.

    b. It is illegal to take out the Opponent’s footing in the Clinch by Sweeping the back of his/her supporting leg with the back of Fighter’s own Leg or Calf.

  9. LIFTING: It is illegal in any way to Lift an Opponent off the ground and Throw him/her on the canvas. If a Fighter Clinches the Opponent around the Waist and Lifts the Opponent off the ground, Twisting and Throwing the Opponent around to the side and onto the canvas in a Suplex.

Scoring the foul to be performed by the Scorekeeper

Fouls may result in a point being deducted by the official scorekeeper from the offending mixed martial artist’s score. The scorekeeper, not the judges, will be responsible for calculating the true score after factoring in the point deduction.

Only a referee can assess a foul. If the referee does not call the foul, judges shall not make that assessment on their own and cannot factor such into their scoring calculations.

Foul Procedures- 31

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If a foul is committed, the referee shall:

  1. call time;

  2. check the fouled contestant’s condition and safety; and

  3. assess the foul to the offending contestant, deduct points, and notify each corner’s seconds, judges and the official scorekeeper.

  4. When the round is over, the referee shall assess the foul and notify both corners’ seconds, the judges and the official scorekeeper.

  5. The referee may terminate a bout based on the severity of a foul. For such a flagrant foul, a contestant shall lose by disqualification.

Time Considerations for Fouls Low Blow Foul

A fighter who has been struck with a low blow is allowed up to five minutes to recover from the foul as long as in the ringside doctor’s opinion the fighter may possibly continue on in the contest. If the fighter states that they can continue on before the five minutes of time have expired, the referee shall as soon as

practical restart the fight. If the fighter goes over the five minute time allotment the fight cannot be restarted and the contest must come to an end with the outcome determined by the round and time in which the fight was stopped.

Fighter who is not fouled by low blow but another foul:

If a contest or exhibition of mixed martial arts is stopped because of an accidental foul, the referee shall determine whether the unarmed combatant who has been fouled can continue or not. If the unarmed combatant’s chance of winning has not been seriously jeopardized as a result of the foul and if the foul did not involve a concussive impact to the head of the unarmed combatant who has been fouled, the referee may order the contest or exhibition continued after a recuperative interval of not more than 5 minutes. Immediately after separating the unarmed combatants, the referee shall inform the Commission’s representative of his determination that the foul was accidental.

If a fighter is fouled by blow that the referee deems illegal, the referee should stop the action and call for time. The referee may take the injured fighter to the ringside doctor and have the ringside doctor examine the fighter as to their ability to continue on in the contest. The ringside doctor has up to 5 minutes to make their determination. If the ringside doctor determines that the fighter can

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continue in the contest, the referee shall as soon as practical restart the fight. However, unlike the low blow foul rule, the fighter does not have up to 5 minutes of time to use at their discretion.

For a foul other than a low blow, the fouled fighter is not guaranteed 5 minutes of recovery time. If deemed not fit to continue by the referee or ringside physician, the referee must

immediately call a halt to the bout. If the fighter is deemed not fit to continue by the referee or ringside physician but some of the five minute foul time is still remaining, the fighter cannot avail himself of the remaining time.

If the referee stops the contest and employs the use of the ringside doctor, the ringside physician’s examinations shall not exceed five minutes. If five minutes is exceeded, the fight cannot be re-started and the contest must end.

Fouls: Intentional.

  1. If the referee determines that a contest or exhibition may not continue because of an injury caused by an intentional foul, the unarmed combatant who committed the intentional foul loses by disqualification.

  2. If the referee determines that a contest or exhibition may continue despite an injury caused by an intentional foul, the referee shall immediately inform the Commission’s representative and the judges and shall deduct two points from the score of the unarmed combatant who committed the intentional foul.

  3. If an injury caused by an intentional foul results in the contest or exhibition being stopped in a later round:

    1. The injured unarmed combatant wins by technical decision, if he is ahead on the scorecards; or

    2. The contest or exhibition must be declared a technical draw, if the injured unarmed combatant is behind or even on the scorecards.

  4. If an unarmed combatant injures himself while attempting to foul his opponent, the referee shall not take any action in his favor and the injury must be treated the same as an injury produced by a fair blow.

Fouls : Accidental.

  1. If a contest or exhibition is stopped because of an accidental foul, the referee shall determine whether the unarmed combatant who has been fouled can

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    continue or not. If the unarmed combatant’s chance of winning has not been seriously jeopardized as a result of a foul and if the foul did not involve a concussive impact to the head of the unarmed combatant who was fouled, the referee may order the contest or exhibition continued after a reasonable interval. Before the contest or exhibition begins again, the referee shall inform the Commission’s representative of his determination that the foul was accidental.

  2. If the referee determines that the contest or exhibition may not continue because of an injury suffered as the result of an accidental foul, the contest or exhibition must be declared a no decision if the foul occurs during the first three rounds of a contest or exhibition that is scheduled for six rounds or less or the first four rounds of a contest or exhibition that is scheduled for more than six rounds.

  3. If an injury inflicted by an accidental foul later becomes aggravated by fair blows and the referee orders the contest or exhibition stopped because of the injury, the outcome must be determined by scoring the completed rounds and the round during which the referee stops the contest or exhibition.

Rings

The ring specifications must meet the following requirements. The ring may be no smaller than twenty feet square and no larger than thirty-two feet square within the ropes. One of the corners must have a blue designation, the corner directly across must have a red

designation.The ring floor must extend at least eighteen inches beyond the ropes. The ring floor must be padded with ensolite or similar closed-cell foam, with at least one inch layer of foam padding. Padding must extend beyond the ring ropes and over the edge platform, with a top covering of canvas, duck or similar material tightly stretched and laced to the ring platform. Material that tends to gather in lumps and ridges may not be used. The ring platform must no be more than four feet above the floor of the building and must have suitable steps for the use of the contestants. The steps should be placed in both of the fighter’s corners, and a third set of steps should be located in a neutral corner for Commission use. Ring posts must be made of metal, not more than three inches in diameter, extending from the floor of the building to a minimum height of fifty-eight inches above the ring floor, and must be properly padded in a manner approved by the commission. Ring posts must be eighteen inches away from the ring ropes.There must be at least four ring ropes not less than one inch in diameter and wrapped in soft material. The lowest rope must be no higher than twelve inches from the ring floor. There must not be any obstruction or object, on any part of the ring floor.There should be at least two rope ties per side of the ring.

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Rule Meetings:

In many jurisdictions, group rule meetings have been commonplace in the reviewing of rules, fouls and other considerations. It is recommended that individual meetings between the bout supervising referee and each competitor in the contest be conducted backstage in the locker room or another appropriate location. Many times contestants will ask questions of the official when the rules are covered individually in private, when they would have been hesitant to ask the same question in front of their competitor. This also provides the referee to observe

any peculiar idiosyncrasies of the fighter, such as an odd speech pattern, nervous ticks, or different eye colors.

This does not supersede the ability of the Commission to have a general rules meeting about the requirements and also discuss items such as a fighter’s time to report, the location, interaction with the inspectors, available liquids and foods, taping requirements and so on, with all the fighters gathered en masse.

Weight Loss

Athletes shall be examined at the pre-fight examination to screen for in excessive or extreme weight loss practices leading to dehydration.

Consumables

Only water or an approved electrolyte drink by the Commission may be consumed during the bout. The use of banned substances is grounds for DISQUALIFICATION and administrative disciplinary action. Particular attention should be given to amateurs consuming energy drinks prior to the contest.

Time Between Bouts-

Unless otherwise cleared by a Commission ringside physician, a Contestant shall not appear in a subsequent event unless:

Four days have elapsed since his last contest or exhibition if the contest or exhibition lasted not more than 4 rounds.

Seven days have elapsed since his last contest or exhibition if the contest or exhibition lasted 5 or 6 rounds.

Fourteen days have elapsed since his last contest or exhibition if the contest or exhibition lasted 7 or 8 rounds.

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Twenty-one days have elapsed since his last contest or exhibition if the contest or exhibition lasted 9 or 10 rounds.

Thirty days have elapsed since his last contest or exhibition if the contest or exhibition lasted 11 or 12 rounds.

Protective Equipment: 1. All ale fighters must wear a steel cup to protect their groin. 2. Women must wear Breast Protection and Rash Guards for shirts. 3. All fighters must wear an approved mouth guard.

Appearance:

  1. Shirts and rashguards are not permitted. (males only)

  2. Shoes are not permitted.

  3. No Head Bands during the Contest.

  4. No jewelry or body piercing.

  5. Hair must be trimmed or tied back. No hair lotions, creams or sprays.

  6. Beards are subject to trimming.

  7. Thai shorts are to be worn by the contestants, as opposed to other types of shorts or long pants.

  8. Knee or ankle braces are not permitted.

During the bout, the fighters may wear an inscribed cloth, ad amulet, or an inscribed charm around the upper arm or strung around the waist, but neatly wrapped and covered with cloth. However, wrapping the ankles or legs with pieces of cloth is prohibited.

Referee: The Referee uses the following three orders. (Thai version in brackets).

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  1. Stop! (Yed!) When he or she wants the Fighters to stop the fight.

  2. Break! (Yak!) When he or she wants the Fighters to separate.

  3. Fight! (Chok!) When he or she wants the Fighters to continue the fight.

ROUND LENGTH – PROFESSIONAL: Are up to five Rounds, three minutes each, with a one minute rest period between each Round.

ROUND LENGTH – AMATEURS: Are up to five Rounds, up to two minutes each, with a one minute rest period between each Round.

EXPERIENCE CLASSES – AMATEURS:

CLASS “A” AMATEURS: Elbows with Pads or Knees to the Head may be permitted.

CLASS “B” AMATEURS: Entry level competitors. Elbows or Knees to the Head are not permitted. Head Guards, Shin Guards, Elbow Pads and Body Protectors may be worn.

Considerations: A fighter cannot be saved by the bell in any round, including the final round.

The three knockdowns rule could be in effect for knockdowns caused by strikes to the head.

The standing eight count can be utilized. Duration of fight cards:

Minimum number of rounds for program. a promoter shall not

schedule fewer than Twenty-five rounds on any one program, without prior Commission approval.

Maximum number of rounds for program. a promoter shall not schedule more than Fifty rounds on any one program, without prior Commission approval.

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Seconds: Only one of the seconds may be inside the ring ropes during a period of rest.

Any excessive or undue spraying or throwing of water on an unarmed combatant by a second during a period of rest is prohibited.

One-sided contest or exhibition; risk of serious injury.

  1. The referee may stop a contest or exhibition at any stage if the referee determines that the contest or exhibition is too one-sided or if either unarmed combatant is in such a condition that to continue might subject the unarmed combatant to serious injury.

  2. The referee shall stop a contest or exhibition of unarmed combat at any stage if the referee determines that both unarmed combatants are in such a condition that to continue might subject the unarmed combatants to serious injury. If a contest or exhibition is stopped pursuant to this subsection, the decision shall be deemed to be a technical draw.

Procedure for counting; knockdown; knockout; technical draw.

  1. When an unarmed combatant is knocked down, the referee shall order the opponent to retire to the farthest neutral corner of the ring, by pointing to the corner, and shall immediately begin the count over the unarmed combatant who is down. The referee shall audibly announce the passing of the seconds, accompanying the

    count with motions of his arm, with the downward motion indicating the end of each second.

  2. The timekeeper, by effective signaling, shall give the referee the correct 1- second interval for his count. The referee’s count is the official count. Once the referee picks up the count from the timekeeper, the timekeeper shall cease counting. No unarmed combatant who is knocked down may be allowed to resume competing until the referee has finished counting to eight. The unarmed combatant may take the count either on the floor or standing.

  3. If the opponent fails to stay in the farthest corner, the referee shall cease counting until he has returned to his corner and shall then go on with the count from the point at which it was interrupted. If the unarmed combatant who is down arises before the count of 10, the referee may step between the unarmed combatants long enough to assure himself that the unarmed combatant who has just arisen is in condition to continue. If so assured, he shall, without loss of time,

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    order both unarmed combatants to go on with the contest or exhibition. During the intervention by the referee, the striking of a blow by either unarmed combatant may be ruled a foul.

  4. When an unarmed combatant is knocked out, the referee shall perform a full 10-second count unless, in the judgment of the referee, the safety of the unarmed combatant would be jeopardized by such a count. If the unarmed combatant who is knocked down is still down when the referee calls the count of 10, the referee shall wave both arms to indicate that he has been knocked out.

  5. If both unarmed combatants go down at the same time, the count

    must be continued as long as one is still down. If both unarmed combatants remain down until the count of 10, the contest or exhibition must be stopped and the decision is a technical draw.

  6. If an unarmed combatant is down and the referee is in the course of counting at the end of a period of unarmed combat, the bell indicating the end of the period of unarmed combat must not be sounded, but the bell must be sounded as soon as the downed unarmed combatant regains his feet.

  7. When an unarmed combatant has been knocked down before the normal termination of a period of unarmed combat and the period of unarmed combat terminates before he has arisen from the floor of the ring, the referee’s count must be continued. If the unarmed combatant who is down fails to arise before the count of 10, he is considered to have lost the contest or exhibition by a knockout in the round containing the period of unarmed combat that was just concluded.

  8. If a legal blow struck in the final seconds of a period of unarmed combat causes an unarmed combatant to go down after the bell has sounded, that knockdown must be regarded as having occurred during the period of unarmed combat just ended and the appropriate count must continue.

Procedure when unarmed combatant has fallen through or been knocked through ropes.

  1. An unarmed combatant who has been knocked or has fallen through the ropes and over the edge of the ring platform during a contest or exhibition:

    (a) May be helped back by anyone except his seconds or manager; and (b) Will be given 20 seconds to return to the ring.

  2. An unarmed combatant who has been knocked or has fallen on the ring platform outside the ropes, but not over the edge of the

    ring platform: 39

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    1. May not be helped back by anyone, including, without limitation, his seconds or manager; and

    2. Will be given 10 seconds to regain his feet and get back into the ring.

  3. If the seconds or manager of the unarmed combatant who has been knocked or has fallen pursuant to subsections 1 and 2 helps the unarmed combatant back into the ring, such help may be cause for disqualification.

  4. When one unarmed combatant has fallen through the ropes, the other unarmed combatant shall retire to the farthest corner and stay there until ordered to continue the contest or exhibition by the referee.

  5. An unarmed combatant who deliberately wrestles or throws an opponent from the ring, or who hits him when he is partly out of the ring and is prevented by the ropes from assuming a position of defense, may be penalized.

. An unarmed combatant shall be deemed to be down when: 1. (a)

Any part of his body other than his feet is on the floor; or

(b) He is hanging over the ropes without the ability to protect himself and he cannot fall to the floor.

2. A referee may count an unarmed combatant out if the unarmed combatant is on the floor or is being held up by the ropes.

 

 

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